Chipin Dogs and Puppies | Dog Breeds Journal

by Monday, February 6, 2017

A Chipin is a mix of a Chihuahua and a Mini Pinscher. It is a breed suited for apartment living. They are very agile dogs and love to play and have fun. Chipins can also be affectionate and cuddly!

Although, Chipins might not be very compatible with kids but you can train them by having them grow up with children, which lessens the risk of any negative encounters. Do you think a Chipin is the one you’ve been looking for? Get to know more about this highly energetic pooch as you scroll on.

Chipin: All the Things You Should Know

What is a Chipin?

A Chipin is a mixed of two small breed dogs and is quite energetic. They are clever and can sometimes be independent. This pooch is protective of its owner, particularly when other dogs are around. They are smart dogs but their stubborn nature makes it hard to train them. But, on occasion, there are some who can be easy to train.

 

What does a Chipin look like?

What does a Chipin look like? | Chipin Dogs and Puppies | Dog Breeds Journal

Image via 101 Dog Breeds

A Chipin is a small dog just like both its parents, weighing around 5 to 18 pounds and stands 8 to 12 inches tall. Chipins are also characterized by their pointed, erect ears with round eyes and a round head. They either have a short or medium coat which may be smooth or silky.

The coat color of a Chipin normally varies from tan, black, white, or any two colors combination. But, there can be other colors like light cream, deep red, or chocolate, in addition to the most common coat colors.

 

What is a Chipin like?

Chipins are very active and energetic dogs who love to play around. You can exhaust all their energy by giving them a regular exercise. It would be a good idea as well to let them socialize with kids but never leave them alone for they might nip if the children annoy them. They can be very territorial and bossy around other dogs too.

 

How are Chipins groomed?

Chipins are low shedders and should be brushed around twice a week. Like most dogs, they need to be bathed when needed and nails trimmed when it gets too long. Check its ears regularly for infection and clean it to avoid any. You might also want to brush those teeth at least twice a week.

 

What are the possible health concerns of a Chipin?

What are the possible health concerns of a Chipin | Chipin Dogs and Puppies | Dog Breeds Journal

Image via Zeissimages

The typical health concerns to look out for are the same with their parents and depends on which genes were passed on. They may inherit health issues like Epilepsy, Collapsed Trachea, Hypoglycemia, Legg-Calve-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, Heart problems, Eye problems, Hypothyroidism, Shivering, Hydrocephalus and Open Fontanel.

You can avoid any of these conditions by getting your puppy from a responsible seller who takes good care of their dams and sires. A way to prevent any of this is to be a responsible owner and you may also have them check by a vet from time to time.

 

How costly can a Chipin be?

How costly can a Chipin be? | Chipin Dogs and Puppies | Dog Breeds Journal

Image via 500px

It would cost you around $150-$600 to own a Chipin. It would cost you at most $250 for its initial vaccines, check-up, deworming, and blood tests. Its yearly maintenance would be around $450-$550 which involves flea prevention, vaccination, annual check-ups, and insurance. Non-medical things like food, toys, leash and collar, treats, and training at most would cost you $300-$400.

 

Want to know how to potty train a Chipin? Watch this video:

 

If you want an active and low maintenance pooch, the Chipin might just be the right breed for you. However, this breed can be difficult to train so first-time pet parents might not be a good fit for this breed. But, if you’re equipped with loads of patience and perseverance to train, this playful and energetic pooch can be your furry best friend!

What other things do you know about a Chipin? Do you think this breed is ideal for you? Type in your comments below!

Do you like a purebred dog instead? The West Highland White Terrier might just be the one you’re looking for! Learn more about the breed here.

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Featured image via ThriftyFun

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